Elon Musk Sells Bel Air Mansion

Elon Musk is having an eventful year so far. The Tesla founder, who has made headlines in recent months for the birth of his son, X Æ A-12, and for his continued attempts to launch rockets into space, just sold off the first of the many homes he put on the market after proclaiming that he would be “selling almost all physical possessions” in May. Musk’s Bel Air mansion was purchased by tech billionaire William Ding, according to the Wall Street Journal, for a whopping $29 million. (The asking price was $30 million.)

The seven-bedroom, 11-bathroom dwelling spans 16,251 square feet, and overlooks the Bel Air Country Club, with views of the Pacific Ocean and Catalina Island on clear days. Though images of the interior of the home are sparse, photos of the house’s exteriors reveal various balconies and patios extending off the structure, with mature trees dotting the landscaped gardens. There’s a large swimming pool with an inset spa, several dining patios, a tennis court, a fruit orchard, and a five-car garage.

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According to WSJ, the listing also notes that the mansion, originally built in 1990, features such amenities as a home theater, a two-story library, a two-room guest suite, a wine cellar, and a gym. Musk still owns several other homes in the area, including Gene Wilder’s former residence, which is situated just across the street. In the series of early May tweets where Musk revealed that he wanted to sell his possessions and “own no house,” he provided one stipulation for the sale of the Wilder house, writing, “it cannot be torn down or lose any [of] its soul.” Other homes the tech mogul has on the market include a modern mansion and three adjacent homes that have a joint asking price of $62.5 million, as well as a 47-acre Hillsborough estate, for which Musk is asking $35 million.

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

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